Easter 2015: a Look at Past Easter Posts on The Exponent

A Little Bit of Paradise by Jana RemyThis week, I was feeling sad that I don’t get to be with my ward on Easter Sunday. I’m sure General Conference will be lovely this weekend, but I’m always a little sad on those years when Easter and General Conference converge. Knowing that I wouldn’t get to hear an Easter talk from a member of the ward. I turned to my other beloved Mormon community here at The Exponent and came across so many pieces that have spiritually fed me during past Easter seasons.

Easter Posts
The Easter Basket by Mraynes: “I went home and pulled out my own Easter basket, the one I had picked all those years ago. It wasn’t the ornate basket of my daydreams, rather it is beautiful only for its simplicity. All of the magic that was lost the day my father revealed truth was captured for me in this basket. This, this, was the perfect basket for my little girl.”

Easter’s Promise by Heather: “Sometimes in winter, when my sweet flower beds are buried under 3 feet of packed, salty snow, I just know nothing can survive. But not too long ago, when it seemed winter would never end, I went out my front door and saw little purple crocuses poking their heads out of the ground.”

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The Parable of Mushrooms

posted on Flickr with Creative Commons license

posted on Flickr with Creative Commons license

I hated mushrooms…

When I was four and I wrote in my journal, “I lik all food excip mushroms.”

Family members would say, “But, they’re really good in this dish.” Or, “Maybe you’ll like them this year.”

Every year or so, I’d try them, and I’d gag, reaffirming my decision that I hated mushrooms.

But, then, about eight years ago, I decided to give mushrooms another try. My oldest kid had a lot of food allergies and after seeing all the foods that would make him sick, I decided it was silly that I was holding out on one food because of a decision I made when I was four.

And, I still hated them. Slimy, tasting of dirt, with a smell that just epitomized everything yucky.

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April Young Women Lesson: Why Do We Need the Book of Mormon?

EmilyCC as a Nephite Woman by Jett AtwoodThis lesson can be found here for Young Women and here for Young Men. I like to use both as I prepare my lessons because there are some great additional resources that can be found in the Young Men’s section.

Find other Young Women lessons for the month of April here.

You’ll have to scroll down a bit, but I believe the strongest part of this lesson begins at “Learning to Love the Book of Mormon.”

Why do we need the Book of Mormon?
I would begin by asking the class the title of the lesson (all questions to ask the class are italicized from here on out; bold indicates a shift in topic).

Why do you think we need the Book of Mormon?

As I prepared this lesson, I remember reading the Book of Mormon as a Young Woman. It was hard because there were so few women in the Book of Mormon. I clung to the stories of Mary and Martha; Ruth and Naomi; Esther, Mary and others. There are very few stories about women in the Book of Mormon and those that are there aren’t always flattering.

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This Ain’t Your Grandma’s Postum

Postum adFive years ago, I was pregnant with my last child, enduring the heartburn that always came with my pregnancies. With a little baking soda, some medication and the swearing off of Diet Coke during my pregnancies, I could manage the heartburn, and as soon as the baby came out, I was back on sweet, sweet Diet Coke (with lemon, if you please).

Except for after my last kid…the heartburn never went away. In fact, it got worse and eventually, I had to swear of Diet Coke forever.

As an adult who tries to watch her calories, all carbonated beverages were out as was fruit juice. And, as a Mormon, coffee and like 90% of tea was out.

Water gets kind of boring (and don’t go telling me about ways to “jazz it up” with a lime wedge).

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What Two Little Jewish Girls Taught Me about Being a Mormon Male Leader

by Miki Yoshihito through Creative Commons license on Flickr

by Miki Yoshihito through Creative Commons license on Flickr

I used to teach piano lessons in my house. Every day after school, I had five to six kids coming in and out. These kids were great—thoughtful, well-behaved, if not the most diligent at practicing the piano.

In the month of December, we always did a Christmas recital. After all, the majority of my students came from my LDS network, and once my oldest started a Church of Christ preschool, I thought it was still a safe bet that everyone was Christian.

In November, we began picking our music, and I gave two sisters who were also relatively new students their songs. We found and agreed to go with “O Christmas Tree” and “Silent Night.” They returned next week having not practiced their songs…at all.

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