Poll: Online Feminism

Posted by on November 27, 2011 in women | 8 comments

Today’s poll comes from a combination of suggestions from readers Fran and Rachel.

It can be a bit scary to put into words – especially searchable words that anyone can read – how we feel about issues like inequality in the Church. But I’m grateful that so many brave women and men choose to open themselves to new ideas and perspectives and share their concerns with others. Respectful, heart-widening, eye-opening dialogue on issues that affect us all in different and profound ways, is one of the most amazing products of blogs like this one and others.

Do you feel that your participation here is compatible with your status as a fully believing member (if you are one)? Do you believe that you can be open to new truth and faithful to old beliefs at the same time? How do you reconcile the discussions here with your level of engagement with the Church? Do you consider yourself active and believing, skeptical and in transition, or non-believing and distant from the Church?

And, if possible, tell us a bit about why you feel the way you do and whether or not the Church plays an active role in your attitude.

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8 Comments

  1. I don’t fit into any of your categories. I was raised in the church and left for a variety of reasons after serving a mission. I am not a believer anymore, but I am a seventh generation Mormon and it’s a deep part of me. Knowing that there are forums like this, and that I’m not alone in my concerns and questions, has caused me to seriously consider coming back to church so I can enjoy the community again. (I’m thinking of coming for Christmas. It will be the first time in several years.) So thanks to all of you Exponent ladies for making a space for people like me.

    • Anon, so glad to have you! Good luck with your Christmas decision–it sounds exciting and terrifying :)

    • Anon: Your comment made my evening. I’m so glad our community here has made a difference.

  2. I’m somewhat introverted as a general rule, but *deeply* antisocial at church. I don’t know why exactly. Something about my general nausea respecting all things Mormon culture? At any rate, for me the transition between meetings (where there are people milling around that could potentially talk to me… *shudder*) is the absolute worst part of church. Very few people know even the most basic things about me. I hate visiting teaching and I don’t do it, and extraordinarily reluctantly allow them to come visit me. But, inasmuch as people know me at all, I don’t have any problem with them knowing about my feminist tendencies. Since I’ve been in nursery , playing on the floor with the little kiddies the last two hours of church, I’ve enjoyed church a great deal more.

    • Monica,
      I feel your pain with the milling around part of church. Worst. Part. Ever. I never understood that– people beg you to come to activities where there is a ton of milling around, yet they can’t speak to you or offer you a seat by them at these activities. Makes no sense.

  3. I see my name! I see my name!!
    I would vote for the last 2 categories, but really, all of them are how I have felt at different times. To try to describe myself and how I view things is just simply impossible. Suffice it to say, I’m an educated, well-read individual. And, comparatively late in life, I have become a person of faith.
    Awhile back Corktree had emailed, asking about getting together. And I told her, truthfully, that part of what I like about blogging is that I don’t have time to be friends in real life. But, there was, back then, a sense of, am I associating with women who are on the verge of apostasy, and what does that even mean? :)
    I am active and believing, and I believe in, and am tremendously grateful for, ongoing revelation. Here’s one little example.
    A couple weeks ago, I was teaching a Primary lesson about the early church, and preaching to the Gentiles. One of the Enrichment ideas was to talk about when “all worthy males” were able to receive the Priesthood. Not one child in that class (all 10 year olds) knew about that piece of church history. One little kid said, “But that’s racist!!” and the look on his face just broke my heart.
    My dad grew up in the deep South. He attended segregated schools. When the revelation came, he was surprised but very happy. Now, 2 generations later, we have children who never knew things to be any other way. I do believe through time, things are changing for women, as well. Is it uncomfortable for people to talk about changes? Sure.
    Years ago, when I was trying to decide about weaning my daughter, I went to a La Leche League meeting. There were women nursing kindergartners there. I was surprised. A woman sitting next to me said, When you come to these meetings you take what you need, and leave the rest. Don’t get caught up in what doesn’t work for you. Focus on what does.
    I’ve been reading the blog for probably 2 years now, and there have been posts which talk about things I disagree with, and then there have been some which could have been written by me, were I so eloquent.
    I guess that is how I feel about the Exponent–I take what works for me and leave the rest.

    • Rachel,
      Thanks for your comment. I’m glad that you find some good things here to take away. It tells me that you are an open-minded person, trying to understand things that you don’t experience or feel.

      We welcome readers with a range of viewpoints, so don’t feel uncomfortable commenting on a thread that you don’t agree with.

  4. Do you feel that your participation here is compatible with your status as a fully believing member (if you are one)? Do you believe that you can be open to new truth and faithful to old beliefs at the same time? How do you reconcile the discussions here with your level of engagement with the Church? Do you consider yourself active and believing, skeptical and in transition, or non-believing and distant from the Church?

    Those are some pretty tough questions, Corktree! I love to read (and occasionally participate on) feminist Mormon blogs. I love the discussions, the questions and the experiences that are brought up that are so rarely brought up at church. I’m not sure what to say about reconciling this engagement with engagement with the Church. I’m pretty far out in what I believe, and my experience with sharing bits of this at church has not been very positive, so I voted that I keep quiet. Occasionally, I’ll run into someone who seems potentially sympathetic, so I might feel out whether I can let more truth about me slip, but that’s rare.

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