September Visiting Teaching Message- Divine Attributes of Jesus Christ: Powerful and Full of Glory

Link to the message on lds.org here.Lioness Roaring

The main story in this lesson is of Christ raising Lazarus from the dead, which admittedly, is some pretty awesome power. However, as I tried to make a list things Christ did with or through power, I noticed they were quite varied. He had physical power over the elements: calming the waves, turning water to wine, feeding the 5000. He had power to heal the blind and sick. He also spoke calmly and powerfully when scriptural and traditional religious arguments were brought to him. He used his power to push cultural norms and customs when it came to talking with and eating with people of varying social levels. His power included showing emotion, being honest about fears and facing them, and forgiveness.

Because we are trying to be like Jesus, ask yourself, am I trying to be powerful? Full of glory? Does it feel weird to consider power to be a goal? It feels a little like that to me.

I think that if I were to do my visiting teaching this month, I would ask a couple of questions to spark a discussion (I’m not really into “lessons” for Visiting Teaching).

  • When have you felt most powerful in your life? Why? How did you get to that point?
  • If that was a while ago, do you have plans again to feel that way soon? If not, what goals could you set for that in the future?

Recently, I have felt powerful because I just got my first full-time job ever. I feel powerful because I am helping pay for the roof over our heads and the opportunities for my children.

In the past, I’ve felt powerful when completing 5ks and a sprint triathlon, even though I don’t consider myself athletic.

When I make a comment that leads to new decisions being made at work or at church, I feel that my influence is powerful.

When my kids shout, “Go Mommy Go!” when I bike up hills with them on the back of my bike, I feel powerful.

I feel powerful when I have a “hard talk” with someone and am honest about my struggles and limits and show empathy for theirs.

 

 

As a visiting teacher, you are in a unique place to honor the power of the women you visit teach. If your visiting teachee has accomplished something recently, offer to be there for the celebration or the big event itself. Or send a card or call her with a message of congratulations.

If neither of you feel like you’ve felt powerful recently or have plans to in the future, maybe set a goal together to accomplish a goal and work with each other towards it.

In the 1990 Women’s Conference Address, Karen Lynn Davidson said,

“The sisters and brothers who find the power within to perform amazing feats of courage, ingenuity, and faith have usually started out as ordinary people, probably unaware of their power until a challenge brought it forth. Each of us is entitled to the comfort and pride of knowing we have those powers within.”

This quote reminded me a lot of Ether 12:27 and how our weakness can become strong. We are both ordinary people and extraordinary people all at the same time.

I’d like to end with the encouragement to do something this month that makes you feel powerful. Feeling powerful helps you think better and makes you feel good about yourself. Go be powerful.

 

TopHat

TopHat is putting her roots down in the Bay Area with her husband and three children. She loves the earth, yarn, and bicycling.

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2 Responses

  1. spunky says:

    This is just what I needed to read today, Tophat! Thank you so much for this! I feel like I’ve been visit taught.

  2. Jenny says:

    What a great visiting teaching message! Thank you. I especially love the image of your kids cheering you on as you bike up a hill. I love how our power can come from such simple things as those, like Christ displaying His power through simple things like not condemning a woman in adultery or telling his apostles to let the children come to him when he was tired.

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